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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
and applause] >> when steve jobs handpicked walter isaacson to write his life story, he had already been diagnosed with cancer, but after 40 interviews, the biography provides a vivid picture of a complicated man. >> i think it's a tough book. >> it's a book that's fair. i mean, this is a real human being. >> you will hear tape recordings of jobs himself talking about being adopted, creating apple, and his regret over ignoring what could have been life-saving cancer surgery. >> you're born alone, you're gonna die alone, and what exactly is it that you have to lose? there's nothing. [ticking] it's so much more intimate than a laptop. >> when steve jobs unveiled the ipad, there was no way he could have predicted what it would mean to people with autism. it turns out it may be the perfect device to help unlock the isolation many with autism feel by helping them communicate in ways that they couldn't before. >> i want a drink. >> i always had said when he was younger, it was like he was a computer and i was computer illiterate, and i didn't know how to press the right keys. sorry. that was t
: that is the suspicion that's shared by a lot of republicans taking it, steve, as almost an article of faith of three weeks, a month, that the president actually wants to go over the cliff and i'm not sure if that's true. i have no way of knowing if that's true. i kind of doubt it. if you look at it, the republicans lose a lot of leverage. they have painted themselves in to this corner. there's no denying that fact. john boehner obviously we know what happened last week. sifting through the wreckage of the plan "b." gone back to plan "a," a bill passed by the congress and extending tax cuts for everyone and sent to the senate. they don't expect the senate to take that. use that as a legislative vehicle and what's today? saturday. new year's eve is -- sorry. today's friday. too much holiday cheer. but come on. i mean -- >> he will be working the weekend. >> reporter: i am. oh my god. i don't want to get started on that. but anyway, you know, there's a lot at stake here. and, you know, it is late for this kind of thing to go on. and really, steve, i know you have been on board for this last several day
. so i think that was a very smart strategic move. >> all right, steve. >> i'll look at the senate level, the smartest move, mccaskill's move, saying you know what i think i want to run against todd aiken, and she quietly helped him get the nomination. the rest is history. not only did it help her race, affect her race she had no business winning, there was obviously a ripple effect that helped democrats nationally. >> chris, the best move of the year? >> i think the best move, joe biden, who answered a question honestly without premeditation and frankly in his "meet the press" interview with david gregory when he was asked about marriage equality. and i think all the reporting afterward, was this a trial balloon, were they trying? no, no, no, joe biden was asked a question and answered with a moral legitimate move, a truthfulness that had these remarkable effects that it pushed the president to come clean about his personal evolution, i think that personally made a difference in the campaign. >> my visual on the campaign, we actually had a visual assist on this. "the washington po
people. time magazine's rana joins us and steve kornacki. it seems to me if you listen to newt gingrich, who has become a commentator every time he's not running for something, you get the sense that you don't want to run against hillary clinton because she's grabbed the scepter. she's quite hawkish on issues like iraq and the middle east generally. i think she's very hawkish xa d compared to most democrats. where is the wiggle room to go against her? >> i completely agree. i think she's done an incredibly great job. she's been incredibly deft at are he positioning the u.s. in a mul multipolar world where we have relatively less economic power. she's managed through digital state craft, through smafert uses of technology to project a soft power and it's been a great credit to our country and i think it's going to be a real tough thing to put in a bad light. >> you know, and, steve, i don't know about your politics on this, i think i'm a little to her left on a lot of thers foreign policy issues like iraq and the middle east. she's positioned herself just where you want to be, a notch o
to be too much of a fight for president? gentlemen, thank you. i want to start with steve on this one. this sunday when given the opportunity to defend hagel, chuck schumer i just mentioned, refused to do so. listen to what this very smart senator from new york had to say. >> that's his choice. i think once he makes it, his record will be studied carefully. but until that point, i think we're not going to know what's going to happen. >> can you support him? >> i'd have to study his record. i'm not going to comment until the president makes a nomination. >> steve, i have a sense that this knocking of this candidate has gone beyond neocons, people of the right. and including people who are just generally pro-israeli which is about most people in politics. i get the fear -- i have to call it fear because i liked hagel, that he may be in trouble now. the shots that have been taken at him about calling it the jewish lobby which is a problem because obviously people are very pro-israeli from the right. to use that term these days is the kind of thing that just ends up causing a lot of probl
people have their own personal reasons -- you're shaking your head, steve, so you get it first. people think, 12 years of intense pressure on you. 4 years of running, 8 years of serving, into your late 70s. does anybody want to inflict that on their lives at the end of their life basically? your thoughts? >> i think there's a compelling case she doesn't run. 1992 they came to the national stage, and they have been on the national stage since then. for 15 of those 20 years all the way through 2007 she was -- she and her husband were the top targets of the right in this country. she called it the vast right wing conspiracy. there was something to that. it's not that they absolutely will beat her in 2016, i think she could beat them, but it's an issue of do you want to endure that kind of day-to-day attack politics, vicious politics, for another four years, for another eight years, or do you want to say i have proven enough in public life and i want to do something else? >> i don't know. i think she showed no signs of her energy lagging as secretary of state, and that's a pretty tough job
. tick, tick, tick, tick, tick. >> i'm steve kroft. >> i'm leslie stahl. >> i'm morley safer. >> i'm lara logan. >> i'm anderson cooper. >> i'm scott pelley. those stories tonight on "60 minutes." [ male announcer ] this holiday at sprint, get $100 off any 4g lte tablet when you buy any smartphone. and get a tablet data plan starting at just $10/mo. no sharing required. hurry into a sprint store or visit sprint.com/tabletoffer today. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance tre
iron oar a lot. >> let's get more insight from steve from web bush securities. how much of a nail biter is this for you in terms of fiscal cliff and the markets? >> i think pretty clear at this point that if there's a deal coming, it's gonna be coming very, very soon. i think the markets discounted the fact we are going to get some sort of deal t has held up fairly well here and i think if we don't get a deal, we will see a selloff. i don't know how considerable, but certainly see the 2, 3% decline in the market. >> does it amaze you, steve, that the markets, in your view, still consider a given that we are going to reach a deal? here we are thursday, december 27th. they still haven't issued a 48-hur notice for congress to return to capitol hill and yet you're saying the markets have baked in some sort of deal? >> yeah, i think so. i don't in he isly think the deal happened december 31st. if we pass waite without a deal earthquake the market will think something is going to happen in early january this is the way washington works, they walk right up to the edge of the deal, maybe even p
for -- and david knock murrah, white house reporter for the washington post. great to have you here. steve, i want to start with you because you just heard senator lieberman say that he thinks it's more likely that we're all going to be going over this cliff than not. is that the sense that you have been getting from lawmakers as well? >> absolutely. first of all, i just checked about 20 minutes ago. there are no talks going on today. the senate comes back on the 27th. there's a lot of stock being put many the fact that maybe mitch mcconnell and harry reid can cut a deal, but mitch mcconnell, though by his nature, is a dealmaker, feels a lot of these same kind of tea party pressures at home that a lot of members of the house feel. he has a potential primary challenge of 2014. the tea party is very strong in kentucky. that's ran paul country. he is very mindful of that. i don't think he is in a position right now to cut any kind of deal that would invite a problem for himself at home. >> all right. when we hear senator john barosso saying he thinks the president is eager to go over the cliff becaus
the process for everybody. >> steve -- >> so he is in a powerful position because it's better for him and everyone if the senate has a unanimous consent as to what should happen. kick it over to the house. >> reed and mcconnell was interviewed side-by-side, it was a rare interview last month. i want to play you about what he said in that interview. and we will get your reaction on the other side. take a listen. >> what was the feeling in that room for you? >> it was very chilly, they did not look at each other once during the course of the interview. >> i thought it would be interesting to see if there was any common ground and we found none. >> we with found none. that doesn't sound like the two men get along very well. >> i don't know that mitch mcconnell has a lot of democratic friend that's pals around with, to be honest with you. so that is not terribly surprising to me. he is is not known as being that type of member of congress. but there are views on levels like harry and mcconnell has been able to come together before. it's not a mcconnell, reed, it's about the house republic
over the fiscal cliff. what happen fess we don't in steve liesman's predictions. >>> have you bought an apple product on-line from anyone? if you have, listen up, snatch and grabs are plaguing apple users throughout the country and are making their way on-line. [ male announcer ] citi turns 200 this year. so why exactly should that be of any interest to you? well, in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. like the transatlantic cable that connected continents. and the panama canal that made our world a smaller place. we supported the marshall plan that helped europe regain its strength. and pioneered the atm, so you can get cash when you want it. it's been our privilege to back ideas like these, and the leaders behind them. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping people and their ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a m
for the economy in the new year. here is steve liesman with a preview of what he expects in 2013. >> trying to figure out what's going to happen in 2013 depends on one very important development. whether the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff in a few days' time. and, for how long. if it's avoided, there's considerable upside for the economy. we could see at least one, and maybe two quarters of growth above 3%. the kind of growth that would put people back to work and lower the unemployment rate. why? because business has been holding back investment under the uncertainty, unleashing business spending would add to the growth from the rebound in housing and from the consumer who has hung in there despite tough times. in fact, we could see unemployment drop below 7%. although it might first rise, and people come into the workforce will be discouraged but then it could start to fall. as for the fed i think the market may be overstating its expectation for asset purchases from the central bank in 2013. at the current pace the new round of quantitative easing will add $1 trillion to the balance she
. and then, you know, i don't think we've run this bite enough. >> tim geithner told steve liesman. >> i have it ready. >> that he is we should show it multiple times. >> tt is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest -- remember, it's only 2%. and all of those americans get a tax cut on the framework of the first $250,000 of their income. >> yeah, yeah, you still get the 250, andrew. they love that. what does oh, absolutely mean, bob? >> maybe it means his favorite movie was "rebel without a cause." >> go the. >> i guess it's letting the other side know you're willing to go eyeball to eyeball with something that is terrible. >> i see both sides pretending to say, yeah, we're doing all we can, but it's almost just like this -- like boehner just said, hey, you guys, you happen, in the democratic-controlled senate, you put a bill together. i'd love to consider it. he can't get his guys to consider a democratic bill. >> as long as they feel like they ca
quiet at the moment, steve. it's one of those things where you feel like something big is going to happen but as you walk through the corridors here, it seems pretty quiet at the moment. >> well, we have all sorts of conflicting reports out there about what the broad framework would be if there's going to be a deal. i guess the big stumble bling block is number one, what is the fresh hold be for the tax income? $250,000 which obama originally proposed? $400,000 which he supposedly offered in a revised offer a week ago? and then, of course, the status of the sequester. we have $1.2 trillion in cuts over ten years, half from defense and half from nondefense discretionary spending. is there any indication if there's a deal today what they're talking about in terms of those two issues? >> we're reading tea leaves but we can say that on saturday there were the most senior-level staffers who were doing the nitty-gritty negotiations. we're told paper was exchanged back and forth meaning proposals being outlined and going back and forth with details. we're told the sticking points we'll
. steve jobs had been cast out, he comes back in, reinvents the company. it's one of the greatest business success stories in the history of modern society if not longer. >> at one point, apple stock approached $700, right? now the stock is, what, near $600? >> yeah, likely because of capital gains. >> who can afford to buy the stock? >> studies have shown, mike, if you buy one share -- you have $500 to invest, you buy one share of a $500 company, you might not think you can make as much as buying ten shares of a $50 company, many studies show you can make just as much because it's $50 for a reason. >> buy one share. i'm not advising. >> where is the libor scandal story? a dozen banks. >> thanks a lot, by the way. >> apparently, my hatred of the uk helped. i didn't want to say libor. >> i know it's boring. >> because the antinm, bore. and i promised barnicle that i wasn't going to say fiscal cliff. i promised not to say it. i found other stories. and libor, i hear you. >> i love that story. terrible word. >> that's what we talk about, libor. in the real world, no. >> big deal. banks are do
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)